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Food Bank overcomes increased costs to feed thousands

Courtesy Food Bank of Wyoming

CASPER, Wyo. — Despite facing inflation, supply chain issues and increased costs in 2023, Food Bank of Wyoming has successfully met the state’s growing food needs, according to an impact report by the organization.

The organization’s 2023 Impact Report highlights its achievements in a year marked by economic hardships.

In a year hit by a 40-year-high inflation, Food Bank of Wyoming served 44,459 clients, nearly 8% of Wyoming’s population. The team drove over 5,000 miles to visit all 23 counties and more than 90 of their 150+ Hunger Relief Partners.

They distributed 9.8 million pounds of food, translating to over 7.9 million meals, with 32% being fresh produce, including 13,000 pounds of potatoes donated by the University of Wyoming’s James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center.

Innovative Approaches amid Difficult Times

Food Bank of Wyoming hired its first food-sourcing manager to enhance local sourcing of protein and produce. The organization also deepened its connection with the Wind River Indian Reservation communities, aiming to establish permanent food pantries.

“Food insecurity is not a new problem … but as we continue to grow and adapt to the needs of our neighbors across Wyoming … we take steps toward a better, more equitable future,” says Executive Director Rachel Bailey.

The Food Bank’s efforts were fueled by community generosity, with 11,819 volunteer hours logged. Bailey emphasizes the importance of continued support and donations to sustain their impactful work.

Getting Involved

Those interested in supporting can volunteer or make a financial contribution at wyomingfoodbank.org. Food Bank of Wyoming remains the largest hunger-relief organization in the state, committed to feeding those in need, with all funds raised in Wyoming staying within the state, according to a press release by the organization.

The full report can be found below.

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