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UW SER releases landowners’ guide to carbon capture, storage

The guide, "What Every Wyoming Landowner Should Know About Carbon Capture and Storage," addresses issues associated with the development of carbon capture and storage technology and explains options for leasing pore space.

Carbon capture and storage (UW SER)

GILLETTE, Wyo. — The University of Wyoming’s School of Energy Resources has released a resource guide for landowners regarding carbon capture and storage.

“What Every Wyoming Landowner Should Know About Carbon Capture and Storage” addresses issues associated with the development of carbon capture and storage technology and explains options for leasing pore space.

UW College of Law 2023 graduate Carson Tanner wrote the publication, with guidance from SER law professor Tara Righetti, according to the release. Tanner also graduated this spring with a master’s degree in environment and natural resources from the Haub School of Environment and Natural Resources. Righetti teaches courses in both SER and the UW College of Law, where her research focuses on governance, property and administrative law issues related to energy development and carbon removal, including on split estates and federal lands.

“I am very happy to have played a part in supporting Wyoming landowners navigating carbon capture and storage as it becomes a more established and promising technology,” Tanner said. “Understanding the basics about what CCS is, how it works and the role that landowners have in its deployment is important for the overall well-being of the state and its citizens.”

Righetti said SER is promoting research-based resources to help educate and benefit Wyomingites.

“CCS and its accompanying policy and regulation are still very new, but Wyoming has been at the forefront in terms of getting information out and we want to make sure that our landowners — and industry — are equipped with the best information possible to make decisions as they move forward,” she said.

Wyoming can help reduce carbon dioxide emissions and support carbon capture and storage technology, the release said.

“Not only is the state abundant with favorable geology for carbon storage, but it also boasts significant investment into infrastructure supporting the new industry, including a CO2 pipeline corridor; proactive legislation to regulate it; and is among the states with the most comprehensive carbon capture incentives,” the release said.

SER has researched carbon storage for more than a decade, the release said. The team has examined the subsurface geology and the feasibility and safety of commercial deployment.

Anyone who would like a printed copy of the guide can contact SER Director of Outreach Christine Reed at christine.reed@uwyo.edu. SER wants to continue to update and expand the guide, the release said. Anyone with questions can submit them here.

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