Statewide COVID-19 Related Deaths Rise to 257

COVID-19
COVID-19

Twenty-seven more Wyoming residents have died of complications stemming from the coronavirus, including three in Campbell County that occurred last month, according to a Thursday afternoon release from the Wyoming Department of Health (WDH).

This brings the state’s total COVID-19 related deaths to 257, with 17 in Campbell County.

The majority of the 27 residents who died were identified as older adults who had been hospitalized or residents of long-term care facilities from Crook, Fremont, Johnson, Laramie, Natrona, Sheridan, Sublette, Sweetwater and Uinta counties.

As of the publication of this story, there have been 29,966 lab-confirmed cases reported in Wyoming with an additional 4,541 probables, per WDH data. Of those, 26,568 residents have since recovered.

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Currently, there are 767 active lab-confirmed cases in Campbell County with 61 of those reported within the past 24 hours. To date, Campbell County has had 2,878 cumulative lab-confirmed cases and 259 probables since the start of the pandemic, with 2,306 total recoveries.

More Wyoming counties implement mandatory masks policies

Residents traveling outside of Campbell County may want to have a face mask on hand when stopping in other cities throughout the state.

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Thus far, 16 Wyoming counties have imposed mandatory mask policies including Teton, Laramie, Albany, Natrona, Sweetwater, Sheridan, Park, Lincoln, Goshen, Sublette, Hot Springs, Carbon, Washakie, Unita, Converse and Crook counties as well as the Wind River Reservation.

16 Wyoming counties and the Wind River Reservation now have mask orders. (Graphic/County 17)
16 Wyoming counties and the Wind River Reservation now have mask orders. (Graphic/County 17)

So far, Governor Gordon has not enacted a state-wide mandatory mask policy, and Campbell County remains one of the seven counties without one.

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CDC shortens quarantines

Wednesday, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated its quarantine guidelines, announcing shortened quarantines for those people exposed to someone with COVID-19.

Previously, CDC’s recommended quarantine was 14 days, which is still the recommended time period as the best way for preventing the spread of the virus. However, the CDC has since issued “two acceptable alternatives,” suggesting quarantines can end in 10 days if the exposed person has no symptoms, or alternatively, seven days if the asymptomatic person tests negative for the virus.